Synthetic Short Stock Explained

Best Binary Options Brokers 2020:
  • Binarium
    Binarium

    The Best Binary Options Broker 2020!
    Perfect Choice For Beginners!
    Free Demo Account!
    Free Trading Education!
    Get Your Sing-Up Bonus Now!

  • Binomo
    Binomo

    Only For Experienced Traders!

Synthetic Stock Option Strategy – Cheapest Alternative to Stocks

Synthetic stocks are a specific kind of option stock strategy. The idea is to mimic the payoff of a normal stock, but without owning the stock. This very simple to set up strategy will act like a stock position but is created with options alone. Due to the leverage that options have, this will be cheaper than buying and holding the actual underlying stock. This is a good alternative to stocks and is a great transition from stock trading to option trading. The following article will be a breakdown of this option strategy:

Synthetic Long Stock

Market Assumption:

As you maybe know by now and can clearly see on the payoff diagram above, this option spread has the exact payoff of a normal long stock position. This is also the reason why it is called synthetic stock. It acts like a stock but is made out of options. The market assumption of a normal long stock position would be a bullish one: the more bullish, the better. Logically, the market assumption for a synthetic stock should then be the same: so bullish. The more the price of the underlying moves up, the more profit will be created. That is the reason why you should ideally hope for a big incline in prices when trading this strategy. This strategy is a directional strategy and is not useful for high probability trading.

Setup:

  • Buy 1 ATM Call
  • Sell 1 ATM Put

This should result in a Debit (Pay to open)

Profit and Loss:

Just like a normal long stock position would be, this spread is both an undefined risk and undefined reward position. This means that both the maximum loss and the maximum win are unlimited and cannot be calculated precisely. The more the price of the underlying asset goes down, the more a synthetic long stockholder would lose. The same counts for the upside. A synthetic long stock constantly profits if the underlying’s price rises. The breakeven point is usually a little above the ATM strike/underlying’s price.

Breakeven Point: Strike of the Options + Debit Paid – Credit received (+ Commissions)

Ex. 100 (Strike) + 12$ (Debit Paid for Long Call) – 11$ (Credit received for Short Put) + 1$ Commissions = 102$ (Breakeven Point)

Maximum Profit: N/A (unlimited)

Maximum Loss: N/A (unlimited)

Implied Volatility and Time Decay:

The option Greek Theta is slightly negative for this strategy, which means that time decay does not work in favor of this strategy. Every day the long option loses some of its extrinsic value. But the short option, on the other hand, gains some value every day. Even though the long option typically loses a little more than the short option gains, time decay only has a relatively small effect on this strategy.

The effect of implied volatility (IV) can be more or less disregarded for a synthetic stock. A rise in IV will lead to an increase in the price of the long call and a decrease in the value of the short put and vice versa. Therefore, this has even a less impact than time decay has on this strategy.

Synthetic Short Stock

Market Assumption:

A synthetic short stock mimics the payoff of a short stock position. Therefore, the market assumption of a synthetic short stock should be the same as the one for a normal short stock position. You hope that the price of the underlying asset will fall. The more the price falls, the better. So this strategy is a bearish option strategy.

Best Binary Options Brokers 2020:
  • Binarium
    Binarium

    The Best Binary Options Broker 2020!
    Perfect Choice For Beginners!
    Free Demo Account!
    Free Trading Education!
    Get Your Sing-Up Bonus Now!

  • Binomo
    Binomo

    Only For Experienced Traders!

Setup:

  • Buy 1 ATM Put
  • Sell 1 ATM Call

This should result in a Credit (You get paid to open)

Profit and Loss:

Again, the payoff of a synthetic short stock is the same as the payoff of a normal short stock. This means that there is no limited risk and no limited profit. It is an undefined risk and profit strategy. The further the price of the underlying moves down, the more profitable a synthetic stock will be. The more the underlying’s price increases, the more money this strategy loses. The breakeven point is a little under the underlying’s price/strike price.

Breakeven Point: Strike of the Options + Debit Paid – Credit received (- Commissions)

Ex. 100 (Strike) + 11$ (Debit Paid for Long Put) – 12$ (Credit received for Short Call) – 1$ Commissions = 98$ (Breakeven Point)

Maximum Profit: N/A (unlimited)

Maximum Loss: N/A (unlimited)

Implied Volatility and Time Decay:

Time decay will only have a little effect on the value of a synthetic short stock. But the spread profits a small amount as time passes because the short call option usually is worth more than the put option when opening.

Implied volatility (IV) will have no to very little effect on the price of the overall spread. Therefore, implied volatility can be ignored when trading synthetic short stocks.

Trader’s Note:

The synthetic stock option strategy is an overall good strategy and can be a good transition from stock trading to option trading. This strategy is a good and cheap alternative to a normal purchase of shares as this is a much cheaper solution. 100 shares of stock can usually not be bought or sold in smaller accounts, this option spread, on the other hand, can be. This allows you to allocate less in a position and still benefit the same amount, because of the leverage that options offer. Nevertheless, synthetic stocks don’t have to be better than normal stock positions. It certainly depends on the time frame that you are planning on holding the position. If your initial plan was to buy/sell the underlying and hold it to make a profit in the very long term, this spread is probably not a good alternative. As you hopefully know, options can expire and stock can not. This means if the options aren’t profitable within a given time frame, they will expire worthless. This spread is a good alternative to buying/selling stock for a short to medium time frame. But longer term trades should ideally still be made with the actual underlying security.

Additionally, synthetic stocks really show the potential and versatility of options. With options, you can do so much more than with stocks. The fact that you even can mimic a stock’s payoff is just one example of that.

To Learn How You Can Take Full Advantage Of The Potential Of Options,
Check Out My Free Options Education here!

How To Set Up Synthetic Stocks In A Broker Platform:

To Learn More, Read My Tastyworks Review!

2 Replies to “Synthetic Stock Option Strategy – Cheapest Alternative to Stocks”

Wow!, while this is above my understanding of the trading platforms, and never heard of it, even though I have dabbled around with and lost money in derivitives, I see that the synthetic trading breakdown can be very simple. Thanks for showing how that is done inside of the program.

Understanding Synthetic Options

Options are touted as one of the most common ways to profit from market swings. Whether you are interested in trading futures, currencies or want to buy shares of a corporation, options offer a low-cost way to make an investment with less capital.

While options have the ability to limit a trader’s total investment, options also expose traders to volatility, risk, and adverse opportunity cost. Given these limitations, a synthetic option may be the best choice when making exploratory trades or establishing trading positions.

Key Takeaways

  • A synthetic option is a way to recreate the payoff and risk profile of a particular option using combinations of the underlying instrument and different options.
  • A synthetic call is created by a long position in the underlying combined with a long position in an at-the-money put option.
  • A synthetic put is created by a short position in the underlying combined wit a long position in an at-the-money call option.
  • Synthetic options are viable due to put-call parity in options pricing.

Options Overview

There is no question that options have the ability to limit investment risk. If an option costs $500, the maximum that can be lost is $500. A defining principle of an option is its ability to provide an unlimited opportunity for profit with limited risk.

However, this safety net comes with a cost because many studies indicate the vast majority of options held until expiration expire worthless. Faced with these sobering statistics, it is difficult for a trader to feel comfortable buying and holding an option for too long.

Options “Greeks” complicate this risk equation. The Greeks—delta, gamma, vega, theta, and rho—measure different levels of risk in an option. Each one of the Greeks adds a different level of complexity to the decision-making process. The Greeks are designed to assess the various levels of volatility, time decay and the underlying asset in relation to the option. The Greeks make choosing the right option a difficult task because there is the constant fear that you are paying too much or that the option will lose value before you have a chance to gain profits.

Finally, purchasing any type of option is a mixture of guesswork and forecasting. There is a talent in understanding what makes one option strike price better than another strike price. Once a strike price is chosen, it is a definitive financial commitment and the trader must assume the underlying asset will reach the strike price and exceed it to book a profit. If the wrong strike price is chosen, the entire strategy will most likely fail. This can be quite frustrating, particularly when a trader is right about the market’s direction but picks the wrong strike price.

Synthetic Options

Many problems can be minimized or eliminated when a trader uses a synthetic option instead of purchasing a vanilla option. A synthetic option is less affected by the problem of options expiring worthless; in fact, adverse statistics can work in a synthetic’s favor because volatility, decay and strike price play a less important role in its ultimate outcome.

There are two types of synthetic options: synthetic calls and synthetic puts. Both types require a cash or futures position combined with an option. The cash or futures position is the primary position and the option is the protective position. Being long in the cash or futures position and purchasing a put option is known as a synthetic call. A short cash or futures position combined with the purchase of a call option is known as a synthetic put.

A synthetic call lets a trader put on a long futures contract at a special spread margin rate. It is important to note that most clearing firms consider synthetic positions less risky than outright futures positions and therefore require a lower margin. In fact, there can be a margin discount of 50% or more, depending on volatility.

A synthetic call or put mimics the unlimited profit potential and limited loss of a regular put or call option without the restriction of having to pick a strike price. At the same time, synthetic positions are able to curb the unlimited risk that a cash or futures position has when traded without offsetting risk. Essentially, a synthetic option has the ability to give traders the best of both worlds while diminishing some of the pain.

How a Synthetic Call Works

A synthetic call, also referred to as a synthetic long call, begins with an investor buying and holding shares. The investor also purchases an at-the-money put option on the same stock to protect against depreciation in the stock’s price. Most investors think this strategy can be considered similar to an insurance policy against the stock dropping precipitously during the duration that they hold the shares.

How a Synthetic Put Works

A synthetic put is an options strategy that combines a short stock position with a long call option on that same stock to mimic a long put option. It is also called a synthetic long put. Essentially, an investor who has a short position in a stock purchases an at-the-money call option on that same stock. This action is taken to protect against appreciation in the stock’s price. A synthetic put is also known as a married call or protective call.

Disadvantages of Synthetic Options

While synthetic options have superior qualities compared to regular options, that doesn’t mean that they don’t generate their own set of problems.

If the market begins to move against a cash or futures position it is losing money in real time. With the protective option in place, the hope is that the option will move up in value at the same speed to cover the losses. This is best accomplished with an at-the-money option but they are more expensive than an out-of-the-money option. In turn, this can have an adverse effect on the amount of capital committed to a trade.

Even with an at-the-money option protecting against losses, the trader must have a money management strategy to determine when to get out of the cash or futures position. Without a plan to limit losses, he or she can miss an opportunity to switch a losing synthetic position to a profitable one.

Also, if the market has little to no activity, the at-the-money option can begin to lose value due to time decay.

Example of a Synthetic Call

Assume the price of corn is at $5.60 and market sentiment has a long side bias. You have two choices: you can purchase the futures position and put up $1,350 in margin or buy a call for $3,000. While the outright futures contract requires less than the call option, you’ll have unlimited exposure to risk. The call option can limit risk but is $3,000 is a fair price to pay for an at-the-money option and, if the market starts to move down, how much of the premium will be lost and how quickly will it be lost?

Let’s assume a $1,000 margin discount in this example. This special margin rate allows traders to put on a long futures contract for only $300. A protective put can then be purchased for only $2,000 and the cost of the synthetic call position becomes $2,300. Compare this to the $3,000 for a call option alone, booking is an immediate $700 savings.

Put-Call Parity

The reason that synthetic options are possible is due to the concept of put-call parity implicit in options pricing models. Put-call parity is a principle that defines the relationship between the price of put options and call options of the same class, that is, with the same underlying asset, strike price, and expiration date.

Put-call parity states that simultaneously holding a short put and long European call of the same class will deliver the same return as holding one forward contract on the same underlying asset, with the same expiration, and a forward price equal to the option’s strike price. If the prices of the put and call options diverge so that this relationship does not hold, an arbitrage opportunity exists, meaning that sophisticated traders can theoretically earn a risk-free profit. Such opportunities are uncommon and short-lived in liquid markets.

The equation expressing put-call parity is:

The Bottom Line

It’s refreshing to participate in options trading without having to sift through a lot of information in order to make a decision. When done right, synthetic options have the ability to do just that: simplify decisions, make trading less expensive and help to manage positions more effectively.

Understanding Synthetic Positions

The basic definition of synthetic positions is that they are trading positions created to emulate the characteristics of another position. More specifically, they are created in order to recreate the same risk and reward profile as an equivalent position. In options trading, they are created primarily in two ways.

You can use a combination of different options contracts to emulate a long position or a short position on stock, or you can use a combination of option contracts and stocks to emulate a basic options trading strategy. In total, there are six main synthetic positions that can be created, and traders use these for a variety of reasons.

The concept may sound a little confusing and you may even be wondering why you would need or want to go through the trouble of creating a position that is basically the same as another one. The reality is that synthetic positions are by no means essential in options trading, and there’s no reason why you have to use them.

However, there are certain benefits to be gained, and you may find them useful at some point. On this page, we explain some of the reasons why traders do use those positions, and we also provide details on the six main types.

  • Why use Synthetic Positions?
  • Synthetic Long Stock
  • Synthetic Short Stock
  • Synthetic Long Call
  • Synthetic Short Call
  • Synthetic Long Put
  • Synthetic Short Put

Why Use Synthetic Positions?

There are a number of reasons why options traders use synthetic positions, and these primarily revolve around the flexibility that they offer and the cost saving implications of using them. Although some of the reasons are unique to specific types, there are essentially three main advantages and these advantages are closely linked. First, is the fact that synthetic positions can easily be used to change one position into another when your expectations change without the need to close out the existing ones.

For example, let’s imagine you have written calls in the expectation that the underlying stock would drop in price over the coming weeks, but then an unexpected change in market conditions leads you to believe that the stock would actually increase in price. If you wanted to benefit from that increase in the same way you were planning to benefit from the fall, then you would need to close your short position, possibly at a loss, and then write puts.

However, you could recreate the short put options position by simply buying a proportionate amount of the underlying stock. You have actually created a synthetic short put as being short on calls and long on the actual stock is effectively the same as being short on puts. The advantage of the synthetic position here is that you only had to place one order to buy the underlying stock rather than two orders to close your short call position and secondly to open your short put position.

The second advantage, very similar to the first, is that when you already hold a synthetic position, it’s then potentially much easier to benefit from a shift in your expectations. We will again use an example of a synthetic short put.

You would use a traditional short put (i.e. you would write puts) if you were expecting a stock to rise only a small amount in value. The most you stand to gain is the amount you have received for writing the contracts, soit doesn’t matter how much the stock goes up; as long it goes up enough that the contracts you wrote expire worthless.

Now, if you were holding a short put position and expecting a small rise in the underlying stock, but your outlook changed and you now believed that the stock was going to rise quite significantly, you would have to enter a whole new position to maximize any profits from the significant rise.

This would typically involve buying back the puts you wrote (you may not have to do this first, but if the margin required when you wrote them tied up a lot of your capital you might need to) and then either buying calls on the underlying stock or buying the stock itself. However, if you were holding a synthetic short put position in the first place (i.e. you were short on calls and long on the stock), then you can simply close the short call position and then just hold on to the stock to benefit from the expected significant rise.

The third main advantage is basically as a result of the two advantages already mentioned above. As you will note, the flexibility of synthetic positions usually means that you have to make less transactions. Transforming an existing position into a synthetic one because your expectations have changed typically involves fewer transactions than exiting that existing position and then entering another.

Equally, if you hold a synthetic position and want to try and benefit from a change in market conditions, you would generally be able to adjust it without making a complete change to the positions you hold. Becaus of this, synthetic positions can help you save money. Fewer transactions means less in the way of commissions and less money lost to the bid ask spread.

Synthetic Long Stock

A synthetic long stock position is where you emulate the potential outcomes of actually owning stock using options. To create one, you would buy at the money calls based on the relevant stock and then write at the money puts based on the same stock.

The price that you pay for the calls would be recouped by the money you receive for writing puts, meaning that if the stock failed to move in price you would neither lose nor gain: the same as owning stock. If the stock increased in price, then you would profit from your calls, but if it decreased in price, then you would lose from the puts you wrote. The potential profits and the potential losses are essentially the same as with actually owning the stock.

The biggest benefit here is the leverage involved; the initial capital requirements for creating the synthetic position are less than for buying the corresponding stock.

Synthetic Short Stock

The synthetic short stock position is the equivalent of short selling stock, but using only options instead. Creating the position requires the writing of at the money calls on the relevant stock and then buying at the money puts on the same stock.

Again, the net outcome here is neutral if the stock doesn’t move in price. The capital outlay for buying the puts is recouped through writing the calls. If the stock fell in price, then you would gain through the purchased puts, but if it increased in price, then you would lose from the written calls. The potential profits and the potential losses are roughly equal to what they would be if you were short selling the stock.

There are two main advantages here. The primary advantage is again leverage, while the second advantage is related to dividends. If you have short sold stock and that stock returns a dividend to shareholders, then you are liable to pay that dividend. With a synthetic short stock position you don’t have the same obligation.

Synthetic Long Call

A synthetic long call is created by buying put options and buying the relevant underlying stock. This combination of owning stocks and put options based on that stock is effectively the equivalent of owning call options. A synthetic long call would typically be used if you owned put options and were expecting the underlying stock to fall in price, but your expectations changed and you felt the stock would increase in price instead. Rather than selling your put options and then buying call options, you would simply recreate the payoff characteristics by buying the underlying stock and creating the synthetic long call position. This would mean lower transaction costs.

Synthetic Short Call

A synthetic short call involves writing puts and short selling the relevant underlying stock. The combination of these two positions effectively recreates the characteristics of a short call options position. It would usually be used if you were short on puts when expecting the underlying stock to rise in price and then had reason to believe the stock would actually fall in price.

Instead of closing your short put options position and then shorting calls, you could recreate being short on calls by short selling the underlying stock. Again, this means lower transaction costs.

Synthetic Long Put

A synthetic long put is also typically used when you were expecting the underlying security to rise, and then your expectations change and you anticipate a fall. If you had bought call options on stock that you were expecting to rise, you could simply short sell that stock. The combination of being long on calls and short on stocks is roughly the same as holding puts on the stock – i.e. being long on puts.

When you already own calls, creating a long put position would involve selling those calls and buying puts. By holding on to the calls and shorting the stock instead, you are making fewer transactions and therefore saving costs.

Synthetic Short Put

A normal short put position is usually used when you are expecting the price of an underlying stock increase by moderate amount. The synthetic short put position would generally be used when you had previously been expecting the opposite to happen (i.e. a moderate drop in price).

If you were holding a short call position and wanted to switch to a short put position, you would have to close your existing position and then write new puts. However, you could create a synthetic short put instead and simply buy the underlying stock. A combination of owning stock and having a short call position on that stock essentially has the same potential for profit and loss as being short on puts.

Synthetic Positions

Simplified Version / Comprehensive Version

Synthetic Positions – Definition

A combination of stocks and/or options that return the same payoff characteristics of another stock or option position.

Synthetic Positions – Introduction

In the early days of option trading where only call options are publicly traded, option traders who wished to speculate a downwards move while limiting upside risk need to “create” or emulate the payoff characteristics of a put option through the buying of call options and simultaneously shorting the underlying stock. The combination of call options and short stocks creates a synthetic put option, or a position with the exact characteristics of a put option. When the underlying stock drops, the call options eventually expires out of the money, losing all of its extrinsic value while the value of the short stock rises. This is exactly the same as holding put options where its extrinsic value decays away upon expiration leaving the net profit on the drop of the underlying stock.

Assuming XYZ shares trading at $50 with $50 strike price Call Option and Put Option trading at $3.00 each.

Assuming XYZ shares dropped to $40 upon expiration of the call and put options.

Long Put: John bought 1 contract of Put Options and made ($10 – $3) x 100 = $700.

Synthetic Put: Peter bought 1 contract of Call Options and shorted 100 shares of XYZ and made ($1000 – $300) = $700. (XYZ shares made $1000 while the $300 spent on the 1 contract of call options expires worthless)

Assuming XYZ shares rallied to $60 upon expiration of the call and put options instead.

Long Put: John’s put options expires worthless and loses $300.

Synthetic Put: Peter’s XYZ shares lost $1000 while the call options gained $700 ([$10 – $3]x100) for a net loss of $300.

In the above illustration, the Long Call Option + Short Stocks creates a Synthetic Put Option where the profits and losses are exactly the same as if Peter bought put options.

In fact, synthetic positions are very widely used and packaged as individual option strategies themselves. The Fiduciary Calls option trading strategy is in fact, a Synthetic Protective Put option trading strategy! Furthermore, there are many option traders who constantly creates synthetic positions through their buying of options and stocks without realizing it themselves. Having a comprehensive understanding of Synthetic Positions also allows you to prevent creating unfavorable Synthetic Positions unknowingly. Completely understanding synthetic positions is a must for every position traders.

Synthetic Positions – The Synthetic Triangle

What the Synthetic Triangle is saying is, a combination of two elements in the synthetic triangle creates a synthetic position of the third element. This synthetic triangular relationship is governed by the principle of Put Call Parity.

Synthetic Positions – Basics

There are 6 basic synthetic positions relating to combinations of put options, call options and their underlying stock in accordance to the synthetic triangle:

1. Synthetic Long Stock = Long Call + Short Put

2. Synthetic Short Stock = Short Call + Long Put

3. Synthetic Long Call = Long Stock + Long Put

4. Synthetic Short Call = Short Stock + Short Put

5. Synthetic Short Put = Short Call + Long Stock

6. Synthetic Long Put = Long Call + Short Stock

In order for the synthetic triangle relationship to work, all options used together must be of the same expiration, strike and represent the same amount of shares used in combination.

It is important to take note here that all options mentioned here are At The Money (ATM) Options.

Synthetic Positions – Synthetic Long Stock

Can you create stock out of options? Yes! You can create a synthetic long stock position simply by:

Synthetic Long Stock = Long Call + Short Put

= +

When you buy a stock, you are exposed to unlimited profits and unlimited losses while losing nothing when the stock remains stagnant. A synthetic long stock completely duplicates those characteristics. The premium gained from the short put covers the premium on the long call (thus losing nothing if the stock remains stagnant), the call option grants unlimited profits and the short put options introduced the unlimited loss.

Assuming XYZ shares trading at $50 with $50 strike price Call Option and Put Option trading at $3.00 each.

Assuming XYZ shares rises to $60 upon expiration of the call and put options.

Long Stock: John bought 100 shares and made ($6000 – $5000) = $1000.

Synthetic Long Stock: Peter bought 1 contract of Call Options and shorted 1 contract of Put Options and made ($700 + $300) = $1000. (The call options made $1000 while the put option offsets it’s price of $300)

Synthetic Positions – Synthetic Short Stock

Can you short a stock without really shorting the stock itself? Yes, you can create a synthetic short stock position by:

Synthetic Short Stock = Short Call + Long Put

= +

When you short a stock, you are exposed to unlimited loss and unlimited profit while losing nothing when the stock remains stagnant. A synthetic short stock completely duplicates those characteristics. The premium gained from the short call covers the premium on the long put (thus losing nothing if the stock remains stagnant), the long put option grants unlimited profits and the short call options introduced the unlimited loss.

Assuming XYZ shares trading at $50 with $50 strike price Call Option and Put Option trading at $3.00 each.

Assuming XYZ shares drops to $40 upon expiration of the call and put options.

Short Stock: John shorted 100 shares and made ($5000 – $4000) = $1000.

Synthetic Short Stock: Peter bought 1 contract of Put Options and shorted 1 contract of Call Options and made ($700 + $300) = $1000. (The Put options made $1000 while the call option offsets it’s price of $300)

Synthetic Positions – Synthetic Long Call

If you are holding a put option or a stock, how can you transform it into a call option without selling your present positions? Simply by constructing a Synthetic Long Call by:

Synthetic Long Call = Long Stock + Long Put

= +

If you are an experienced option trader, you would be able to immediately tell that the above equation is saying that Fiduciary Calls = Protective Puts! That’s right! That’s what this synthetic position is trying to say.

Assuming XYZ shares trading at $50 with $50 strike price Call Option and Put Option trading at $3.00 each.

Assuming XYZ shares rallies to $60 upon expiration of the call and put options.

Long Call: John bought 1 contract of Call Options and made ($1000 – $300) = $700.

Synthetic Long Call: Peter bought 100 shares and bought 1 contract of Put Options and made ($1000 – $300) = $700. (The shares made $1000 while the put option expires its entire value of $300)

Synthetic Positions – Synthetic Short Call

If you are holding a short put option or a short stock position, how can you transform it into a short call option position without selling your present positions? Simply by constructing a Synthetic Short Call by:

Synthetic Short Call = Short Stock + Short Put

= +

When you short a call option, you are exposed to limited profits, unlimited losses and the premium on the call options decay to your advantage. The short stock contributes the limited downside profits (all the way to $0 so technically unlimited profits to downside) and the short put options limit that profit to the premium decay of the put options while offsetting part of the loss to upside.

Assuming XYZ shares trading at $50 with $50 strike price Call Option and Put Option trading at $3.00 each.

Assuming XYZ shares drops to $40 upon expiration of the call and put options.

Short Call: John shorted 1 contract of Call Options and made $300.

Synthetic Short Callk: Peter wrote 1 contract of Put Options and shorted 100 shares and made ($1000 – $700) = $300. (The Put options lost $700 while the shares made $1000)

Synthetic Positions – Synthetic Short Put

If you are holding short call position and want to participate on an upwards move on that stock without closing your short call position, you can construct a Synthetic Short Put by:

Synthetic Short Put = Short Call + Long Stock

= +

In a Short Put option position, you are exposed to limited profit to upside and unlimited loss potential while gaining the extrinsic value no matter what happens. Long Stocks contributes the unlimited loss potential to the synthetic position while the short call limits the potential upside profit.

Assuming XYZ shares trading at $50 with $50 strike price Call Option and Put Option trading at $3.00 each.

Assuming XYZ shares rallies to $60 upon expiration of the call and put options.

Short Put: John shorted 1 contract of Put Options and made $300.

Synthetic Short Putk: Peter wrote 1 contract of Call Options and bought 100 shares and made ($1000 – $700) = $300. (The Call options lost $700 while the shares made $1000)

Synthetic Positions – Synthetic Long Put

If you are holding long call position and want to participate on an downwards move on that stock without closing your long call position, you can construct a Synthetic Long Put by:

Synthetic Long Put = Long Call + Short Stock

Assuming XYZ shares trading at $50 with $50 strike price Call Option and Put Option trading at $3.00 each.

Assuming XYZ shares drops to $40 upon expiration of the call and put options.

Long Put: John bought 1 contract of Put Options and made $700.

Synthetic Long Putk: Peter bought 1 contract of Call Options and shorted 100 shares and made ($1000 – $300) = $700. (The Call options lost $300 while the shares made $1000)

Synthetic Positions – Why Use Synthetic Positions?

Why would anyone create a synthetic long call when they can simply buy call options? In fact, why would anyone use synthetic positions at all when all the instruments are now available to all option traders? Synthetic positions are useful for option traders who wish to speculate on a reverse expectation on their current holdings without closing the current holdings. Synthetic positions are also much more flexible than its equivalent instrument, making it possible to take advantage of changing conditions quicker and at a lower transaction cost.

Synthetic Positions For Reversal Of Expectations
For example, you are short call options, speculating a moderate drop in the underlying stock. However, recent developments convinced you that the underlying stock could make a moderate upwards move instead of a moderate downwards move. Instead of closing your short call option position, you could simply transform it into a synthetic short put position which profits when the underlying stock makes a moderate rally through buying a proportionate amount of the underlying stock.

Synthetic Positions For More Flexibility
Synthetic positions allows an option trader to quickly change from one expectation to another without making a complete change to existing holdings. This makes the change faster and cheaper. From the above example, if the underlying stock continues to go up and is expected to make a sustained rally, you would simply transform the synthetic short put position into a long stock position by closing out the short call options.

If you had simply closed out your short call options and then wrote put options initially, you would now have to close out your short put options and buy either the underlying stock or a call option right now. Synthetic positions allowed that transition from a moderate down outlook to a moderate up outlook to a sustained up outlook very smoothly.

Synthetic Positions For Lower Transaction Cost
In the above example, if you had done the conventional method of buying and selling positions, you would have incurred 4 transactions in all:

Write Call —> Buy Back Call —> Write Put —> Buy Back Put —> Buy Stocks

If you had used synthetic positions instead, you would have incurred only 3 transactions:

Write Call —> Buy Stocks —> Buy Back Call

Lesser transactions translates into lower transaction cost, which makes synthetic positions the most cost efficient way of trading in volatile times.

A comprehensive knowledge of synthetic positions allows an option trader to better hedge existing holdings and become more flexible in taking advantage of short term price anomalies. This is why all Market Makers need to be completely familar with synthetic positions.

Synthetic Positions – Conversions & Reversals

Conversion & Reversals are important synthetic position concepts pertaining to the closing out of synthetic positions using the actual financial instrument that they represent in order to both maintain the original position and hedge against short term price movements. Conversion & Reversals can also be used to take advantage of options arbitrage opportunities. Read more about Conversion & Reversal Arbitrage.

Synthetic Positions – Pricing

The principle of Put Call Parity governs the pricing of synthetic positions, reducing arbitrage opportunities through conversion or reversal.

Best Binary Options Brokers 2020:
  • Binarium
    Binarium

    The Best Binary Options Broker 2020!
    Perfect Choice For Beginners!
    Free Demo Account!
    Free Trading Education!
    Get Your Sing-Up Bonus Now!

  • Binomo
    Binomo

    Only For Experienced Traders!

Like this post? Please share to your friends:
Binary Options Trading For Beginners
Leave a Reply

;-) :| :x :twisted: :smile: :shock: :sad: :roll: :razz: :oops: :o :mrgreen: :lol: :idea: :grin: :evil: :cry: :cool: :arrow: :???: :?: :!: